OUR STORY

Hermon Free Methodist Church

In the early 1900s the Free Methodist Church decided to build a seminary, or Christian school, in the Southern California area.  Denomination leaders met at a campground meeting in the Sycamore Grove Park area and were looking for land on which to build their church and school.

Church pioneers began purchasing the lots and camped on them while building homes to live in once their children began attending the seminary.  More than 50 cottages appeared in the first year, 1903. The original school at 625 Coleman Avenue evolved — from Los Angeles Free Methodist Seminary to Los Angeles Pacific College (LAPC), which also included a small high school — and in 1965 LAPC merged with Azusa College and moved to Azusa, becoming Azusa Pacific College, later University.

After the move, a renamed Pacific Christian High School remained on the site until it closed in 2004.  The historic property was sold in 2006 to Anaheim-based Bethesda Christian University, who then leased the high school site to Los Angeles International Charter High School.

Back in 1903, Free Methodist leaders originally named the community “Hermon,” after Mount Hermon mentioned in the Old Testament of the Bible, the northern boundary of the Promised Land (Deuteronomy 3:8) given to the Israelites after the Exodus from Egypt. “See, I have placed the land before you; go in and possess the land which the Lord swore to give to your fathers . . .” (Deuteronomy 1:8 a,b)

Many of Hermon’s streets were named after early Free Methodist leaders such as Terrill, Kendall, Redfield, Coleman, and Ebey.

 

04_American.School_1 03_Original.Church_1  FMClogo02a_Hermon.1906_1imagesChurchFrontNEWHCLOGO (2)